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  1. #1

    Flying a Quadcopter

    I don't yet have a quadcopter because I am worried about flying it. I have failed to be able to fly a regular RC helicopter and a simulator.

    Is the quadcopter simply one stick for forward, back, left, right and the other stick for throttle?

    Is it easy to fly for a totally flying handycapped old guy?

    If I do get a quadcopter what video equipment (what brand and model is best) can a typical quadcopter carry?

    Thank you for any help.

    LDBennett

  2. #2
    Senior Pilot
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    Hey, I'm a guy who hasn't really flown RC too before I started my quad project.
    My experience is that the flying itself goes pretty well, but its hard.

    And as with a lot of things: with practice comes skill.

  3. #3
    flying a quadcopter is exactly like flying a rc helicopter. its not something easy, but it can be fun
    dont know about the video question, I built a heavy lifter and have yet to see how much it can lift

  4. #4
    I was such a total failure at flying a helicopter and the simulator that the comments here about it being hard is a big deterrent to getting the quadcopter. Anyone else had similar experience and was still able to fly quadcopter? Honestly, I could not get the helicopter to even hover. I thought with all the gyros that the quad copter would be dead simple to fly without constant adjustment to the stick that performs forward, back, left, right. I thought once trimmed up you could simply remove your hand from the control and it would remain nearly motionless.

    LDBennett

  5. #5
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    It will probably be a long time before it's "nearly motionless" with your hands off the sticks, but if you build a nice quad, buy the right equipment, trim it up right, and get used to the controls a bit, it'll be close... maybe.

    I say maybe because as with all things, "with practice comes perfect". I had never flown a single RC anything previous to building my first quad... then I wrecked my first quad in about 5 minutes. It was tough to fly at first, but a week or two later, after practicing an hour or so every other day, and I was flying full batteries without setting it down. Flash forward another month or two, and I'm doing flips with my Kinjal, and can easily fly giant, diving, figure-eights! Now it's a blast!!! But it was certainly challenging at the start.

    The trick is to keep your hands smooth, start small (literally on the ground for a while), and FLY IN OPEN PLACES! So many people try to fly in their garages that it makes me sick

    Make sure and read: http://aeroquad.com/showwiki.php?tit...ng+Flight+Tips and http://aeroquad.com/showwiki.php?tit...ed+Flight+Tips

    Any other specific questions about learning to fly? Just keep your mind open, and your spirits high. It'll be fun!

  6. #6
    Moderator AeroQuad Core Software Developer kha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firehopper View Post
    flying a quadcopter is exactly like flying a rc helicopter. its not something easy, but it can be fun
    I would say flying quad in 'stable' mode is quite similar to flying a 'coaxial heli'.

    Flying in rate mode is then quite similiar to flying a '3D' helicopter.

    I also recommend getting the barometer (and maybe sonar too) to get altitude hold, it's very usefull on training as one can concentrate more on the flying wihtout need to handle the altitude at the same time.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryanpearson View Post
    It will probably be a long time before it's "nearly motionless" with your hands off the sticks, but if you build a nice quad, buy the I had never flown a single RC anything previous to building my first quad... then I wrecked my first quad in about 5 minutes. It was tough to fly at first, but a week or two later, after practicing an hour or so every other day, and I was flying full batteries without setting it down.
    Haha, exactly the same thing here!

    Quote Originally Posted by bryanpearson View Post
    Flash forward another month or two, and I'm doing flips with my Kinjal, and can easily fly giant, diving, figure-eights! Now it's a blast!!! But it was certainly challenging at the start.
    Still have to get there, but I think when I got my quad rebuilt, I'll get there
    Point of the story: Don't be afraid, just try and learn!

  8. #8
    Moderator AeroQuad Core Software Developer kha's Avatar
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    and on a rainy day a hour spent on flying a quad (or a heli) on a simulator is well spent.

  9. #9
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    Greetings,

    I personally bought, assembled and attempted to fly a nitro powered helicopter 15yrs ago. The construction was a blast but I never could get it more than 5-6' off the ground without losing control.
    I became so frustrated after months of tweaking/testing/tweaking I shelved the $1400 kit and let it collect dust. Browsing the web as I do I came across a youtube video of someone flying a
    quad and instantly starting reading all I could on the subject and finally decided on building one following the Aeroquad wiki. Within two weeks of purchasing the equipment I had my quad
    up and flying better than I ever did the gas powered single rotor. I hovered with almost no effort in stable mode. If I take it out of stable mode forget it After 10-15 flights under my belt in stable
    mode I could fly 15+ minutes (full battery) without needed to set it down. Now after 50+ flights under my belt I rarely have incidents where I feel I am going to lose control and if I do I simply release
    all but the throttle and the craft levels out all by itself. I have switched into acro mode multiple times during my flying but found I have a lot to training to do All in all its not easy but my experience
    is that a quadrotor in stable mode tuned correctly is at least 10x easier to control than the single rotor with no self-leveling abilities.

    As far as sticks go it depends on the mode your in, I think I have mine in mode 2, where the left stick up/down is throttle and left/right is turns the craft counterclockwise/clockwise (yaw). The right stick up/down is
    tilts the craft forward/backwards (pitch) and the left/right motion tilts the craft to left/right (roll). Most rigs today let you program the sticks to fly they way you feel comfortable.

    Someone else can pipe up on good video equipment but I wouldn;t spend a dime on that until you get control of your craft :>
    I personally use a GoPro mounted on the front of the craft to to capture flights, not FPV, just video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwTUh...9&feature=plcp

  10. #10
    Well, I tired the cheapy helicopter with counter rotating blades and the simulator but no luck. I hate to put the $1000 it will take in the end only to find out I can't fly a quad either. You would think with all the gyros and other electronics that the stupid thing would know how to hover on its own. I guess not. More thought on the matter is necessary. That's a lot of money to gamble on. Is there a more disposable choice than the $400 plus radio stuff version?

    But hey, I appreciate all the helpful comments. Thank you one and all.

    LDBennett
    Last edited by LDBennett; 01-19-2012 at 10:09 PM.


 
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